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Find COBRA Insurance information in your state.

Find Out if There's COBRA in your State

State COBRA Insurance Plans

In order to use the federal COBRA continuation benefits you must work at a company with at least 20 full time employees or their part time equivalents, but what if the company didn't have that many? To open up COBRA benefits to more people who worked at smaller companies, most states have passed their own regulations usually known as Mini COBRA laws, State COBRA insurance, or State Continuation insurance. The policies vary widely from state to state in terms of price and length, but most states have some kind of state COBRA regulations.

Here is a Summary of What is Available for State Level COBRA

Arkansas: Under the Arkansas law (Code of 1987 - Title 23, Chapter 86 - Section 23-86-114, 23-86-115, 23-86-116) if an employer has fewer than twenty employees than under the state law they can sign up for Arkansas Continuation insurance as long as they were on the plan for 3 months or more. This coverage for Arkansas COBRA lasts for 120 days and the employee must request it within 10 days of job loss.

California: Under the California Insurance Code Section 10128.50 - 10128.59, which is also referred to as Cal COBRA (California Continuation Benefits Replacement Act) employees from companies with 2-19 employees and their spouses/dependents can continue their health insurance after job loss under Cal COBRA. These benefits last up to 36 months (3 years). To sign up for Cal COBRA insurance you must complete an enrollment form within 60 days for each individual you wish to continue insurance form. You can also use Cal COBRA to extend your benefits after federal COBRA runs out.

Colorado: Under the Colorado Revised Statute 10-16-108, employees who work at companies with under twenty employees are entitled to continue their group coverage with Colorado COBRA for up to 18 months or until they qualify for a new insurance plan. Employees and family members must have been on the plan for at least 6 months to qualify and must notify the employer that they wish to continue coverage with Colorado Continuation within 30 days.

Connecticut: The Connecticut Continuation of Health Benefits (House Bill 6266, Public Act 97-268) allows employees and their family members to continue their health plan after job loss if they worked at a company with between 2-19 employees. The continuation can be used for up to 29 months and will cost 102% of the premium. Additionally this law allows disabled individuals to continue to continue their health plan free of charge for up to 29 months.

District of Columbia: Employees and their family members are able to continue their group health plan for up to 3 months if the plan is still active and covered between 2-19 employees. You must notify your employer immediately if you would like to use Washington DC COBRA coverage while you look for another policy.

Florida: Under the Florida Health Insurance Coverage Continuation Act (Insurance Chapter 627.6692) people living in Florida who worked at smaller companies (under 20 employees) may sign up for Florida COBRA coverage that works the same way as federal COBRA. The coverage lasts for 18 months and costs 115% of the premium cost. For any individuals who are disabled they may continue their care for up to 29 months. Employees and their family members have 30 days to notify the insurance company that they would like to continue coverage from the date of job loss.

Georgia: Under the Georgia COBRA Continuation law (Georgia Official Code Title 33, Chapter 24, Sections 33-24-21.1 and 33-24-21.2) employers who have fewer than twenty employees are required to continue health care coverage for up for 3 months if the employee enrolls in state COBRA. The employee must have been on the plan for 6 months or more for these to be required.

Illinois: Under Illinois COBRA also known as the Illinois Continuation Law, employers with under 20 full time employees must offer health insurance continuation to all employees after job loss. The normal coverage length under this law is 9 months, however some people can use the coverage for up to 24 months. You must enroll within ten days of the notification date and have been on the plan for at least 3 months to use Illinois COBRA.

Iowa: The Iowa Continuation Law (Iowa Insurance Code 509B.3, Section) offers 9 months of continuation coverage for people who worked at smaller companies. You have 30 days to sign up after job loss and the coverage is only valid while you do not have insurance through another source.

Kansas: The Kansas COBRA law (also known as Kansas Continuation Law, K.S.A 40-2209) works the same way as the federal COBRA plan and allows employees to extend their extend their insurance coverage with the same employer sponsored plan for up to 18 months or until they find alternate insurance. It is specifically for people who work at companies with fewer than twenty employees.

Kentucky: The Kentucky COBRA law is under Kentucky Subtitle 18, the Group and Blanket Health Insurance law, and it entitles employees to 18 months of continuation insurance after job loss. They must have been on the health plan for at least 3 months and they must not qualify for federal COBRA. The employees have 31 days to sig up for Kentucky COBRA and in certain cases coverage may be extended to 30 months total when there is a disability.

Louisiana: The Louisiana COBRA insurance law is part of the Group Health Insurance Continuation (Louisiana RS 22.215.13) and it allows employees and their families to continue their health plan after job loss for up to 12 months. It was designed specifically for people working at smaller companies and therefore do not qualify for federal coverage. To use the Louisiana Continuation you must sign up within 31 days of receiving your election notice and must have been on the plan for 3 months or more.

Maine: As part of the Maine Continuity of Health Insurance Coverage (Statute 24-A, Chapter 36), employers must give their employers access to Mini COBRA coverage within 31 days of losing coverage if they worked at a company with between 2-19 employees and meet the other COBRA requirements.

Maryland: Under the Maryland Continuation of Coverage for Terminated Employees Act (Title 31), employees and their families Title 31 of the Maryland Insurance Administration, Chapter 4 addresses Continuation of Coverage for Terminated Employees. This law is similar to federal COBRA in that it allows for terminated employees to remain insured under the employer's group health insurance for a period of 18 months following the termination of full-time employment. The election period is 45 days.

Massachusetts: As part of the Small Group Health Insurance/Continuation of Coverage (Chapter 176, Section 9 of 22) people living in Massachusetts who do not qualify for federal COBRA due to the size of their workplace can sign up for Massachusetts COBRA for up to 18 months. In order to qualify for this you must have been on the employer health plan for 39 weeks or more.

Mississippi: Mississippi COBRA coverage is part of the Insurance Code 83-9-51 of 1972 that makes it a requirement for employers with under 20 employees to continue to use the employer sponsored plan for up to one year after they lose, quit, or are terminated from their job. They normally must undergo a 3-month waiting period before that are able to enroll in Mississippi Continuation insurance.

Missouri: As a part of the Missouri Revised Statutes (Chapter 376, Section 376.428), workplaces that have under twenty employees are required by law to offer COBRA coverage for up to nine months. To be eligible the employee must have been enrolled in the health plan for 3 months or more and the plan will be terminated if the employee qualifies for new insurance or fails to pay the entire premium on time.

Nebraska: In Nebraska there is a Mini-COBRA law that the state created to offer insurance to people who aren't qualified for the federal plan because their plans cover fewer than twenty employees. The Nebraska Mini COBRA lasts for 9 months.

Nevada: As part of Chapter 689B companies who have under twenty employees must offer health insurance continuation to their employees after job loss including quitting, retiring, and being terminated. The coverage will last for up to 18 months or until the employee finds a new insurance plan.

New Hampshire: In NH, the state legislature passed Chapter 415, which is part of the New Hampshire Title 37, and in that law employers that have between 2-19 employees are required to offer COBRA coverage to their employees for a period of 18 months. During this time they will continue the employer sponsored plan. In some cases, employees can continue the COBRA coverage in NH for an additional 18 months.

New Jersey: In the state of New Jersey, businesses that have under 20 employees are required to offer continuation insurance to their employees as part of Reg. Chapter 17B, Section 27-60. The coverage can last up to 18 months or until the employee is eligible for a new health plan. Additionally in events of death or divorce, spouses and children can qualify for up to 36 months. The cost of New Jersey COBRA insurance is 102% of the full premium.

New Mexico: For employees and their family members who lose their health insurance coverage due to job loss and who do not qualify for federal COBRA because their company only has 2-19 employees, they can enroll in New Mexico COBRA insurance under NM Title 13, Chapter 10, Part 11.31. This continuation law says that individuals and their family members can continue their health insurance for up to six months with NM COBRA.

New York: New York COBRA Insurance, sometimes called NY Mini COBRA or New York Continuation insurance was passed as park of the New York Insurance Regulation in Article 32. This law makes it necessary for employers with between 2-19 employees on their health plan to offer terminated employees COBRA coverage for up to 18 months. Employers have five days to send an election form to their employees.

North Carolina: As part of the NC General Statutes and Article 53 of Chapter 58 the state requires that employers with under twenty employees that are on a group health plan offer COBRA continuation coverage to employees and their families for up to 1.5 years. The employees have 60 days to enroll and the cost is 102% of the premium.

North Dakota: For employees who work at companies with less than twenty employees, the state has set up a North Dakota COBRA insurance law that requires employers to provide them with continuation insurance. The coverage can be used for up to 39 weeks but will end early if you find new insurance or fail to pay the premium.

Ohio: When employer plans cover less than twenty employees in Ohio, they must provide their employees with Ohio COBRA benefits and continuation insurance. The employee will qualify if they have been on the plan for at least 3 months and must have been terminated. You do not qualify for Ohio COBRA if you quit. This coverage will last for 6 months.

Oklahoma: The Oklahoma legislature passed the OK Statute Title 36, Chapter 1, Article 45, which created a state COBRA insurance plan for people with between 2-19 employees. The plan will provide Oklahoma continuation insurance for up to 6 months.

Oregon: In order to use Oregon's Continuation of Coverage insurance, you must not qualify for federal COBRA because the company you worked for has less than twenty employees. If this is the case, you can continue your coverage for up to 6 months with Oregon COBRA.

Rhode Island: The Rhode Island Mini-COBRA insurance laws are specifically meant for people who work at companies with between 2-19 employees and therefore do not qualify for federal COBRA. This continuation coverage in Rhode Island can last up to 18 months or until the employee qualifies for a new insurance plan. In most cases it costs 102% of the premium.

South Carolina: When employees lose their jobs and were on a plan that covered 2-19 employees in South Carolina, they usually can use the SC COBRA plan also known as South Carolina Continuation insurance. It lasts for up to six months under the law.

South Dakota: Under the Continuation and Conversion of Health Care Persons (Chapter 18C of Title 58) in South Dakota, individuals and their family members who were on an employer sponsored health plan that insured 2-19 people can continue to use that plan for up to one year. They must have been on the plan for at least six months to qualify.

Tennessee: The Tennessee Cobra Regulations (Chapter 7 of Title 56) ensure that there is coverage continuation for people who do not qualify for federal COBRA insurance because there are fewer than twenty employees on the plan at their workplace. They can use this continuation for up to 3 months and must sign up within 31 days of losing their coverage.

Texas: As part of Texas Continuation coverage, employers with 19 or less employees on their health plan must offer COBRA coverage for 6 months to terminated employees. If you were enrolled in federal COBRA insurance and live in Texas, the Texas COBRA plan can extend your coverage for an additional 6 months after the federal program ends.

Utah: In Utah there is a UT Mini-COBRA law that makes employees who work at smaller companies able to sign up for COBRA insurance coverage for up to 6 months. This state passed legislation is meant to open up COBRA benefits to more people living in the state.

Vermont: To open up COBRA insurance benefits to more people the state of Vermont passed Chapter 107 of Title 8 that makes it a state law for employers with at least 2 and less than 20 employees to offer continuation insurance to employees after job loss. They must have been on the plan for at least 3 months and can use COBRA in Vermont for up to six months.

West Virginia: As part of Article 16 of Chapter 33 in the West Virginia Insurance Codes, employers with between 2-19 employees on their health insurance plan must provide the option to enroll in West Virginia for up to 18 months to all employees and their family members after job loss.

Wisconsin: The Wisconsin Continuation Law (Reg. 632.897) entitles all people who were part of an employer sponsored group health plan to continue their insurance for up to 18 months from what would have been the last day of coverage. It is only for people who do not qualify for federal COBRA because their employer plan had less than twenty people on it.

Wyoming: Wyoming COBRA insurance is available to people living in WY who were disqualified from federal coverage because their employer health plan did not have enough members. The coverage can last up to 12 months from the termination date.

Learn more about COBRA in your state

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Disclaimer: This information about state COBRA laws should not be used as a substitute for legal advice. State laws frequently change so you should visit your state's Department of Labor for complete details. For states that are not on the list, likely there is not a Mini COBRA program.